Why Ocarina of Time Isn’t Just A Link to the Past in 3D

HanyouJuly 7th, 2012 by Hanyou

Since I started participating in the Zelda community in 2004, a common criticism I’ve heard against Ocarina of Time–and it does usually take on the tone of criticism–is that it is A Link to the Past in 3D. In my experience, it’s generally older fans making this claim, but regardless, it’s been there for a while now. However pervasive this particular claim is, it does lend itself to some discussion about how Zelda games transitioned into 3D, and where the franchise stands now. Superficially, the games are similar. Both games use a dual-world mechanic and both follow a similar structure–three introductory dungeons in the “light world,” and a more thorough game in the “dark world.” The meat of the entire game is in these dark worlds, actually, and the story bears this out, with Ganon/Ganondorf ruling the darker realms. Notably, both games offer freedom which has long since left the series–you can play the dungeons and progress through the overworld out of order.

But the similarities, numerous as they may seem, end there. A Link to the Past is, at its core, much like the first game in the franchise. That means it’s an action game with few environmental puzzles, tight overworld design, and a constant focus on acquisition and management of items. The story is rudimentary at best, and while the presentation is good, it mostly lacks distinct characters or rich lore. Most of all, there’s an ever-present feeling of danger, propelled by difficult gameplay.

Ocarina of Time looks and feels entirely different. It plays differently, too, probably as a consequence of its status as the first 3D Zelda game. There are few enemies populating the overworld and even the dungeons; each fight is more of an event than individual fights in A Link to the Past, complete with battle music. Most importantly, dungeons are entirely different. While it was possible to get lost in A Link to the Past’s dungeons, it offered nothing remotely resembling The Water Temple. Ocarina of Time bought environmental puzzles to the fore, and it wasn’t about the “big questions” like how to access half the map–it was about finding your way out of each room. There is also much more of a focus on getting to each of the individual dungeons; each one is preceded by increasingly lengthy, linear quests specific to each part of the overworld. This makes the path to each dungeon less integrated (it’s less likely you’ll obliviously stumble upon a dungeon), but more developed.

Ocarina of Time’s contribution to the series’ lore is much more significant. A Link to the Past presented us with decent backstory, but without characters or thorough sidequests, mostly felt like the empty world of a video game. This doesn’t necessarily make it worse, just more streamlined, more suited to the action focus. Ocarina of Time, with its exploration focus, offered us new races, each with their own unique histories. Like A Link to the Past, every location had a backstory, as well–but here, it was more thoroughly developed and hinted at through the characters.

If anything, Ocarina of Time felt more like a spiritual successor to its immediate predecessor, Link’s Awakening. That game offered Ocarina songs, a more user-friendly experience, and individual characters who played a role in the story at large. It also placed a focus on poignant subplots, and ironically also more fully developed signature Zelda humor. This same tone was carried over to Ocarina of Time and even Majora’s Mask.

The dual-world mechanic and structure aren’t enough to make Ocarina of Time a clone of A Link to the Past. The dual-world mechanic is far more developed and pervasive in A Link to the Past, with constant switching between worlds, and as far as structure is concerned, it doesn’t always have much impact on the specifics of any gameplay moments.

Ocarina of Time would not have been possible without either of its predecessors, but it certainly has a place as a further development of existing themes and gameplay ideas. The influence is there, but it’s often overstated. While it adheres to the Zelda formula which A Link to the Past pioneered, it is not a stagnant moment in time. Its 3D gameplay necessitated an entirely different approach. Once again, I should stress that none of this makes one game any better than another. What it does is showcase how Nintendo developed specific ideas and adapted them to a handheld or 3D space. It also acts as a refutation against a more common criticism of the franchise as a whole, that each game is simply a “rehash.” Zelda games have their own ideas, they simply use structural similarities as platforms for those ideas. That’s how it should be–what would a Zelda game be without a common thread or gameplay mechanic to tie it to the others?

Even if you’re not familiar with the argument I’ve tackled here, I encourage you to participate in the discussion. How similar are Ocarina of Time and A Link to the Past, really? How similar are other games? Is the pervasiveness of the Zelda formula overstated?

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  • aeok18109

    I enjoyed both games thoroughly when they were first released. I look forward to getting my Nexus 7 tablet so that I may load up your impeccable guides here on Zelda Dungeon and plow through the games all over again in order and not miss anything ^_^.

  • That One Guy!

    I don’t think people should be so critical about it, sure it DOES have 3 starter dungeons and to alternate worlds, but that is like getting a cupcake and then scraping, like, 90% of icing off. Don’t think of what things are SIMILAR think of way that the series are DIFFERENT! Link to the pasts main perspective is a flat 2D world, whereas Ocarina of time focused on 3D environments and many things built upon that idea creating new and different challenges.

  • http://www.facebook.com/warren.brown.9279 Warren Brown

    I think that the argument in a whole is invalid… The only similarity (as stated above) is the light world / dark world theme…

    • Jeremy

      I swear you have not played ALTTP.

  • http://david.vankomen.me/ David Van Komen

    Thanks for clearing this up Hanyou. The games are pretty similar, but there are distinct differences that show that they’re completely different games, as you outlined in your article. ALttP was certainly a wonderful game, but that didn’t give Nintendo grounds to make OoT its 3D counterpart.

    The games have many similarities, to be sure, but so do many other Zelda titles. The Zelda forumla is actually starting to get old in my eyes. It has worked for quite a long time, yes, but sometimes I just feel like I’m playing the same game with different puzzles or stories. Skyward Sword tried to clear that bit up a tad, but it didn’t really work for me and became one of my least favorite titles in the series for that and other reasons.

    Great article Hanyou.

    • Scunder

      I felt the same way about “playing the same game with different puzzles” when playing Twilight Princess, then again with Skyward Sword, although I love both.

      Still, we can’t really blame Nintendo for this, if we compare to other franchises they are doing a terrific job protecting theirs and are releasing new games in a good pace. But reading some recent interviews I think Mr. Aonuma and Mr. Miyamoto are feeling the same way we do, that they need to make a complete revolution in the series.

      If I had to bet I would say we are about to face the longest hiatus in a new Zelda for home consoles. We should not hold our breaths for a Zelda WiiU.

      • http://www.facebook.com/StuartConfrey Stuart Stephen Confrey

        Whats the whole reason a zelda game works so well?? Link the hero must face massive odds and help save his world and zelda. The first game saw you running around a world with no idea of what your doing after princess zelda hides the several segments of the last remaining triforce piece. Zelda 2 was a little different in game play but it still had the same structure as link must awaken zelda from her deep sleep. ALTTP, you see link thrown in at the deep end as a young man just trying to save his grandfather and then told he must rescue the maidens and stop ganon from breaking free from the dark world. OOT the hero of time, this game is an odd one in the story line because if link never openned the door of time ganondorf would never have reached the sacred realm and caused all the trouble. This would then eliminate most of the zelda games from ever happening, but its still that same loving style we all know.

        The sacred realm exists in all the games, as does the triforce, even if you dont actuallt hear about them or see them. These two things are what cause and break hyrule over the many years that separate the games. The trifoce was made from the three gods, after they created the planet. Goddess Hylia fought demise with the goddess sword and sealed him away after sending the people to the sky in an attempt to keep them safe from all the evil on the surface. Link a boy born in skyloft must then forge the master sword and defeat demise once more before he destroys everything. The master sword is the only thing that will truly destroy and seal him away. Demise tells link that a curse will always plague his and zeldas families for all time. After this rauru from OOT seals the triforce away in the sacred realm using the master sword as a seal, he creates the temple of time once more and uses this as the gateway. Time goes buy and then ganondorf is born to the garudo and sets his eye on the triforce. The master sword must be pulled out to defeat him, but because link is to young his spirit is kept in the sacred realm (OOT), or dark realm (ALTTP), they are the same place!! If he had waited the 7 years before pulling it ganondorf wouldnt have entered the sacred realm, but as you do the story unfolds. This is where the rest of the games come in. If link was unable to defeat ganon in the final battle, ALTTP is able to happen as well with the first 2 games. If he does defeat him and seal the sacred realm again with the master sword, the wind waker and spirit tracks is able to happen.

        This is why everything happens. I honestly dont believe zelda would be the same if you change the style of how you must gather items and defeat dungeons. There is always a reason as to why you must do this. To forge a sword, to gather the spirits of people. Imagine OOT if it didnt do this? ALTTP if it didnt have the dungeons, even if the game has become slightly predictable, it wouldnt be the ZELDA we all love if it didnt have these basic similar styles.

        So pulling / creating / repowering the sacred evil killing sword and saving hyrule from the clutches of evil is THE LEGEND OF ZELDA, change that and this franchise will be ruined! Theres only one reason we all love playing these games and thats because of this similar storyline and structure :) Just think about what you loved when you first played a zelda game and this WILL be the reason. LINKS MASSIVE QUEST is the only reason no doubt about it.

    • 7thHanyou

      Thanks, David. I agree with you about things getting stale, but as I said in response to another post, I believe this is due to the increasing linearity. I think the same formula would still allow for plenty of variation if they just opened things up. Instead, the games have been getting more linear since Majora’s Mask.

      • http://david.vankomen.me/ David Van Komen

        That makes complete sense. The games are so terribly linear now, that I’m just not having as much fun with the new ones.

  • Guest

    Fantastic article. I’d like to thank you for not showing bias toward one game over the other, but rather explaining how the games each have numerous distinctions beyond the common threads of game structure and formula. Both games are fantastic in their own right.

    The one thing I might disagree with you slightly is your rebuttal against the common criticism of the Zelda series, in which people say each game is just a “rehash”. This is surely an unfair criticism of the franchise. While I don’t believe the games are really rehashes of their predecessors, I do think the general formula is getting a bit predictable and stagnant. The “x-number of dungeons to earn plot tickets, plot twist, another x-number of dungeons to get more plot tickets” structure could be tweaked a bit, if only for a game or two, just to give it some variety and make things feel refreshing. Nothing drastic or so different it won’t feel like a Zelda game anymore–just enough to shake things up so I don’t see things coming.

    Still, good article. Clear, concise, and a sensible analysis of what makes both games unique.

    • 7thHanyou

      Thanks. I do agree with you to an extent on the structure, but don’t see what they could do to change it. I think less linearity would do a lot to help things–in that sense, the games have moved in the wrong direction. More optional dungeons, perhaps branching plot threads, and different paths through the game reduce monotony even if the formula stays the same.

  • Tommyjoe Pete

    This is what I’ve been saying for YEARS with Oot and TP! Just because a game comes after the game you grew up playing as a kid, does NOT mean its a modified remake and/or worse. Thank you, Hanyou.

    • 7thHanyou

      I will be honest: I didn’t like Twilight Princess very much. In spite of that, I think calling it an OoT remake or rehash is very unfair–once again, it has its own ideas, and there are lots of different directions the developers went in.

      It certainly isn’t a remake.

    • http://medlismessages.blogspot.com/ Heroine of Time

      I really dislike the argument that that statement comes from nostalgic people. I played Twilight Princess before I played Ocarina of Time, and yet I still don’t like TP as much and I still can see where it was a lot like OoT. It’s not at the point of calling it a remake, and I still love TP, but I definitely think it could have had more originality.

      …I don’t want to get into a debate… I’m just saying… XD

  • TehLeetHaxor

    OoT and ALttP are not even that similar. The only similarities that I found between the two games are the overlaying dungeon structure (3 starter dungeons) and the light world / dark world system. OoT has a completely different atmosphere and feel compared to ALttP. I don’t understand why people keep saying that OoT is simply a 3D version of ALttP.

  • K2L

    If only somebody could tell fanboys that Metroid Prime isn’t just “Super Metroid in 3D”, ….

  • Maxbe

    It totally is a 3D Link to the Past. The same way a Link to the Past is a 16 bit Legend of Zelda (NES)
    The developers recreated the same games with more advanced technology and changed it up a bit, but thats not a bad thing, it was the right thing to do because they are different enough to be enjoyed as singular games, but the general skeletons, or DNA is there. Its the same with how Super Metroid was a 16-bit evolution of Metroid (they are basically the same game, even more so than Zelda’s situation) and how Metroid Prime is a 3D evolution of Super Metroid (Kraid was in the code for Metroid Prime but scrapped, lending evidence to this idea). Even Metroid Other M, as much as the story sucked, was basically a 3D Metroid Fusion, but being more linear Metroid games taking place in space stations simulating multiple environmental Biomes.

  • Letsrant!

    It seems like I recall hearing that OoT started as an ALttP remake, which gives us the apparent similarities. However, the hypothetical ALttP 3D, if made properly (that is, without Eiji Anouma’s involvement) would be a much better game than OoT.

  • MW7

    I’ve said this before, and I’d admit it’s quite the exaggeration. I do feel like the games are still exceptionally similar while still being different. I played Ocarina of Time way before A Link to the Past, but for me the freedom and progression sticks out most as the biggest similarity. In both games (without glitches) the first true dungeon must be completed before entering others, the third dungeon can be completed before the second if you obtain the item from the second and leave, and the second halves allow for more freedom. Also there’s the freedom within dungeons that is evident from the amount of keys you can carry at once. Later Zelda games went to a key, door, key, door dungeon progression rather than collecting keys in a nonlinear fashion. Misery Mire and the Water Temple are two of the most nonlinear dungeons ever and in both you can hold up to four small keys at once.
    Also you didn’t mention anything about items, and there were some striking similarities. Besides items that were directly carried over there were items that were altered but retained the same basic function. For instance the spell medallions operate similarly to the spells in Ocarina of Time, the ice and fire rods are elemental projectiles like the ice and fire arrows, and both games have invincibility items that use magic. Also the flute and the ocarina both are used for warping, and here’s a freaky coincidence. In both second halves of the games you must use warping to reach the dungeons that hold the 6th crystal/medallion according to the subscreens (Misery Mire and the Shadow Temple).
    The differences you pointed out are all true, but you understandably downplayed the similarities as those weren’t the main focus of your article. I agree that Ocarina of Time isn’t A Link to the Past in 3d, but they are pretty similar. I’ve called Ocarina of Time a 3d version of A Link to the Past before, and I really meant it as a compliment because of the high regard I hold A Link to the Past in.

    • 7thHanyou

      Perhaps I can more fully develop my opinion on items in a future editorial, as I did overlook that. However, I think as far as items are concerned, many Zelda games are similar. I admit that I didn’t think about HOW similar the two are as much.

      Thanks for your comment.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/James-Best/100003863840372 James Best

    I’ve never felt Ocarina of Time ever leaned on A Link to the Past anymore than any other Zelda game leans on its predecessors. Each game is its own experience that happens to share common elements.

  • http://www.facebook.com/seth.hallmann Seth Hallmann

    no its A LINK TO THE FUTURE get it a link to the past goes into the past to save the world but in oot its a link to the future

    • itsameluigi1290

      Skyward Sword is a link to the future. That’s what the back of the box says, anyway.

      EDIT: My bad, that was the Nintendo Channel short description.

  • Lili

    Ocarina of Time is waaaaaaay better too.

  • Linkfan99

    I am debating whether or not to play ALttP. I have only played one other overhead 2d zelda game (excluding Spirit tracks and phantom hourglass) and this was minish cap. it was okay, but frankly i didn’t like it too much. so should i play ALttP or not?

    • H37I

      well, it’s got 10 and half dungeons and ganon’s tower. if you like zelda games with a crapload of dungeons, then a link to the past is the one for you.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jshangreaux Jessica Ryan Shangreaux

    OoT and ALttP are not even the same, but I love how this article brings out that they are entirely different, I think its time for the fans to help with the zelda series, because I think everyone has their own interpretation of the series, Awesome article!!!~ 8-)

  • http://www.facebook.com/StuartConfrey Stuart Stephen Confrey

    Whats the whole reason a zelda game works so well?? Link the hero must
    face massive odds and help save his world and zelda. The first game saw
    you running around a world with no idea of what your doing after
    princess zelda hides the several segments of the last remaining triforce
    piece. Zelda 2 was a little different in game play but it still had the
    same structure as link must awaken zelda from her deep sleep. ALTTP,
    you see link thrown in at the deep end as a young man just trying to
    save his grandfather and then told he must rescue the maidens and stop
    ganon from breaking free from the dark world. OOT the hero of time, this
    game is an odd one in the story line because if link never openned the
    door of time ganondorf would never have reached the sacred realm and
    caused all the trouble. This would then eliminate most of the zelda
    games from ever happening, but its still that same loving style we all
    know.

    The sacred realm exists in all the games, as does the triforce, even if
    you dont actuallt hear about them or see them. These two things are what
    cause and break hyrule over the many years that separate the games. The
    trifoce was made from the three gods, after they created the planet.
    Goddess Hylia fought demise with the goddess sword and sealed him away
    after sending the people to the sky in an attempt to keep them safe from
    all the evil on the surface. Link a boy born in skyloft must then forge
    the master sword and defeat demise once more before he destroys
    everything. The master sword is the only thing that will truly destroy
    and seal him away. Demise tells link that a curse will always plague his
    and zeldas families for all time. After this rauru from OOT seals the
    triforce away in the sacred realm using the master sword as a seal, he
    creates the temple of time once more and uses this as the gateway. Time
    goes buy and then ganondorf is born to the garudo and sets his eye on
    the triforce. The master sword must be pulled out to defeat him, but
    because link is to young his spirit is kept in the sacred realm (OOT),
    or dark realm (ALTTP), they are the same place!! If he had waited the 7
    years before pulling it ganondorf wouldnt have entered the sacred realm,
    but as you do the story unfolds. This is where the rest of the games
    come in. If link was unable to defeat ganon in the final battle, ALTTP
    is able to happen as well with the first 2 games. If he does defeat him
    and seal the sacred realm again with the master sword, the wind waker
    and spirit tracks is able to happen.

    This is why everything happens. I honestly dont believe zelda would be
    the same if you change the style of how you must gather items and defeat
    dungeons. There is always a reason as to why you must do this. To forge
    a sword, to gather the spirits of people. Imagine OOT if it didnt do
    this? ALTTP if it didnt have the dungeons, even if the game has become
    slightly predictable, it wouldnt be the ZELDA we all love if it didnt
    have these basic similar styles.

    So pulling / creating / repowering the sacred evil killing sword and
    saving hyrule from the clutches of evil is THE LEGEND OF ZELDA, change
    that and this franchise will be ruined! Theres only one reason we all
    love playing these games and thats because of this similar storyline and
    structure :) Just think about what you loved when you first played a
    zelda game and this WILL be the reason. LINKS MASSIVE QUEST is the only
    reason no doubt about it.

    Every game happens because of a previous game or one thats been recently released. The whole history is connected and this is whats making this franchise so massive and unique.

    • http://www.facebook.com/StuartConfrey Stuart Stephen Confrey

      One thing extra, if the dark world in ALTTP is the sacred realm we hear of from OOT, the two games cannot be the same as its not hyrule. The sacred realm is completely separate from the Hyrule you play in. Although it does run along side it. In OOT you only play in Hyrule, as a child and 7 years later once you pull the master sword. You do enter the sacred realm every time you collect a medallion at the end of a dungeon but you dont enter the sacred realm like in ALTTP and run around. End of!! :) Thats why OOT is not ALTTP!

    • http://www.facebook.com/StuartConfrey Stuart Stephen Confrey

      A Link To The Past Quote – ** maiden number 3 **

      “Only a person of the knights of Hyrule, who protected the royalty of Hylia, can become the hero… You are of their blood-line, arnt you? Then you must rescue Zelda without fail”

  • itsameluigi1290

    *Sees that there are 25 comments* First– *Shot*
    Great article, man. Or woman. I haven’t plyed aLttP yet, but I’m hoping to get it soon.

  • Jo Five

    I like the Zelda formula, because even though I know what to expect, the formula WORKS. Deviating too far from the Zelda formula would be much like New Coke; someone might like it but we buy Coke for Coke. If we wanted a Pepsi, we’d buy a different drink.
    But each Zelda is a different flavor. Some like Vanilla, some like Cherry or Lime, some like Plain, Diet or Zero versions. And distinguishing one from the next is welcoming so long as the whole remains familiar.

  • TheMaverickk

    This article just doesn’t get it.

    No offense the argument most people make is not that Ocarina of Time is just Link to the Past 3D… it’s the fact that much of the core of Ocarina of Time takes directly from Link to the Past.

    Which in all honesty is truth. The article touched a little on some elements that Ocarina of Time took from Link to the Past (Both games use a dual-world mechanic and both follow a similar
    structure–three introductory dungeons in the “light world,” and a more
    thorough game in the “dark world.”). Still there was a lot more that was taken directly from Link to the Past.

    For starters the mythos. That’s right, the very legend of a Sacred Realm comes from Link to the Past. Aspects like the three pendents/sacred stones/pearls/flames (representing each goddess and triforce attribute) unlocking the Master Sword originated in Link to the Past. The creation story that the Deku Tree tells is the same one told in Link to the Past.

    The sages of Ocarina of Time are clearly connected to the sages (and by association the sage maiden descendents) of Link to the Past.

    It isn’t just the mythos that Ocarina of Time borrowed… but even many game moments.

    Aghanim is a wizard who volunteers his services to King of Hyrule. Ganondorf in many respects acts very similar. Gaining the trust of the King, all the while using that proximity and power to seek out power through objects like the Sacred Stones just as Aghanim used his position to search out the Sage Maidens.

    Just as Kakoriko’s statue center piece in the dark world hid a monster filled dungeon, so does OoT’s Kakariko hide a monster filled dungeon under it’s center piece… the well.

    Just as acquiring all the Sage Maidens unlocks Ganon’s Tower in Link to the Past, gaining the power of the Sages in Ocarina of Time unlocks access to the games own Ganon’s Tower. An area that in both games forces the player to relive elements from past dungeons.

    Even boss fights are borrowed. Think that Twinrova was the most original boss fight ever? Well think about this… just as Twinrova was the boss of the final Temple, Trinexx was the boss of Link to the Past’s final dungeon. What do the bosses have in common? Both feature a Fire and Ice mechanic. Although the fight plays out differently due to the items used, it’s a very interesting choice to make both games last bosses share such a specific similarity.

    Even the climatic battle with Ganondorf (and Phantom Ganondorf by association) in Ocarina of Time is taken from Link to the Past. Using the Master Sword to repel a summoned orb attack back at the wizard caster. How you do it in 2D versus 3D may be different but the idea is still the same.

    The games may be unique in their own right, and Ocarina of Time is still a fresh experience with it’s own cast of characters, but that doesn’t change the fact that at it’s core Ocarina of Time takes heavily from Link to the Past. Something very few Ocarina of Time fans are willing to admit…. and in many cases most Ocarina of Time fans may not even know about. I personally have met many people who think Ocarina of Time was actually the first Zelda game ever made. Not even realizing that there were 4 games that came out before it.

    • http://www.facebook.com/StuartConfrey Stuart Stephen Confrey

      You say that they use similar boss’s and ideas, but if you look right back to zelda 1, that game had the dodongos and zelda 2 had dark link. The advancement of technology just means that they can make the encounters of older bosses so much more interesting. I cant think of even one zelda game that DOESNT have a boss of item or idea from an older game. But then thats zelda. And i still dont believe that you can call it copying the 2 flames/stones etc. They are the history of the gods and how the world was created by then. Everything you collect has a link to a sage or god or something like that. So it doesnt matter what game you play really, the main idea is that link must collect there power to help defeat the evil. Thats the main link between all the different games including the master sword.

      • TheMaverickk

        You have to remember that all those elements have been in most subsequent Zelda games AFTER Link to the Past.

        The original Legend of Zelda and Adventure of Link didn’t have the same amount of universe building mythos that Link to the Past did. They set the primary focus in order (the Triforce, a chosen hero bearing the crest on his hand, and the maiden Zelda’s special bloodline). Still it wasn’t until Link to the Past that you got the iconic Master Sword, and many other series defining elements.

        Also although Link to the Past was built on the foundation of the original two titles, it was still greatly different, and game play wise much more refined into the Zelda we know today. The original Legend of Zelda didn’t have the “find a dungeon item to defeat dungeon boss” mechanic. Neither did Adventure of Link. Both titles generally relied either sword action or hints to help you defeat enemies. Just because you got the bow and arrow in a dungeon in the original Legend of Zelda doesn’t mean that it was required to defeat that dungeons boss.

        Also dungeon design in the original Legend of Zelda was flat. There weren’t multiple floors (some cellar rooms served as transportation and held items though).

        Everyone seems to think that Ocarina of Time was the first Zelda game to bring dungeons into the 3rd dimension but believe it or not many of LInk to the Pasts dungeons were built with three dimensions in mind. Navigating multiple floors, falling from one floor to the next and jumping from raised ledges to lower ledges. Even if the game was built in 2D that doesn’t mean the game world itself didn’t have depth.

        This article tries to cheapen Link to the Past as being “basic” and somehow raise Ocarina of Time to this level of this high point of game design just because the world was built in polygons, but truth be told the world of Link to the Past had just as much depth and some of the most genius dungeons.

        Really all I’m pointing out is that despite the fresh appeal of Ocarina of Time, and it’s legendary status in the Zelda series, a lot of it’s identity and core is still built on Link to the Past (I’d go as far as to say that 50% of Ocarina of Time could be attributed to Link to the Past).

  • Triforce

    TP is just a 3D version on ALTTP, you have a light world- darkworld system, when you enter the darkworld you become an animal (just like in ALTTP) and there is a “dark wizard” Zant- Aghiem.

  • P. Na$

    thiz iss bulsht! OoT is jist anuthur ALttP. Tey bolth hav 2 wrlds n ganondork. link is teh heroe in bolth of dem. zelda iz a princest in bolth of tem. shud i go on wiht teh simelaritys?

  • Kravik

    Another good article proving why one need to have played at least 10 Zelda games, before one should start making comparisons. :p

  • Ganon

    ALTTP was a back story to every game before. OOT was a back story to every game before.

    Zelda’s Lullaby was in ALTTP 1st.

    Collect 3 things.

    2nd world That looks almost exactly like the main one.

    Master Sword (OOT was the 2nd game to use it, after ALTTP)

    I’m not an older fan by the way. I’m 11. I played 12 Zelda games, so I can compare them.